Category Archives: Not on Ffraed

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I’m intrigued by historians, Alan Wilson’s and Baram Blackett’s contention that Empress Helen brought ‘the true cross’ to Dyfed and concealed it in a cave here. Y Ddraig Ffraed flows through this cave.

As well, Alan Wilson relates whispered stories he heard from the locals, when he was a kid living for a time with his uncle on a farm near Dinas Cross. In hushed and reverent close company they told how the old folk knew, and passed down through the generations, an even greater secret…that Jesus was buried nearby.  This site is not on the dragon.

The following are some of the posts I’ve made to do with these matters and more, on Britain’s Hidden History FB page:

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A Green Hill Far Away…Without a City Wall

An article first published on the Song of Ffraed private, and then on ellisctaylor.com

Introduction

I have more to add regarding Alan Wilson’s proposal that Jesus is buried in West Wales.

Besides Gilbert’s, Wilson’s and Blackett’s, The Holy Kingdom, I’ve also been dipping into Australian sleuth author, Tony Bushby’s heretical tome, The Bible Fraud. I’ve no idea if they are aware of one another’s work.

Who of them is more right than the other I have no idea but both parties have carried out decades of deep and committed research and come up with masses of detailed information which includes several major and minor agreements and contradictions. Their strongly referenced compilations are inevitably uncomfortable for settled posteriors in religious and academic rectangles.

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Featherfoot

 

After having spent two years or so living in the Bush I returned to Perth in 1995 and moved into a house in the suburb of Viveash, near the Swan River. In the garage the previous owners had left an assortment of items, among them was an unusual spear. It was barbed, carved and pyrographically patterned, and even though it had been broken at the end it was at least 7 feet long. It was clearly ancient. This was no ordinary inheritance. I knew in the heart of me, without knowing why, that I was now, in some mysterious way, not the owner, but rather the custodian of something quite extraordinary.

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Strange Incident at Stonehenge

A short clip from a talk Ellis gave to the audience of the Ammach conference in the spring of 2013. In 1997, Ellis visited the famous megalithic site, for the first time in 40 years. He wanted to see how the site had changed. He remembers visiting Stonehenge at about the age of 5, when it was in an open field.

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St. Margaret’s church & well, Binsey, Oxfordshire

St. Margaret’s church & well, Binsey, Oxfordshire

Midnight, and monks by candlelight

Although less than 2 miles from Oxford’s city centre St. Margaret’s is hidden behind trees and shrubbery at the end of a long and winding country lane. The church is a strange, isolated and moody little building sometimes welcoming and warm while at other times slightly sinister. It is lighted only by oil lamps and candles as it has no electricity supply.

St. Margaret’s was once the living for a priest called Nicholas Breakspear, who became England’s only Pope, Adrian lV, in 1154.

The church is also famous for its holy well and its legendary connection to St. Frideswide, the patron saint of Oxford. I strongly suspect that Frideswide is really the ancient Briton’s goddess and saint, Ffraed.

This was the ‘Treacle Well’ of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

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Parc-y-Meirw (Field Of The Dead)

 

parc y meirw 1809 by Colt Hoare

 

Parc-y-Meirw (Field of the dead), Llanllawer, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
Stone Row
Not on the Ffraed
Grid reference: SM998359
Ordnance Survey

The name actually refers to the field, not the stones. Parc-y-Meirw (Field of the dead), is so called because generations-old local folklore says this field is  where the fallen from a battle (Mynydd Carn – 1081¹) between the Welsh princes were laid to rest. Two megaliths, once part of a straight row of giant bluestones, now act as the gateposts to this field.

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