Category Archives: Healing

Communing with saints. Calling for warriors.

Robin Heath, stone stalker and archaeoastronomer, has spent very many years rediscovering and demonstrating the knowledge and genius of people who have walked these Isles before us.  In his information-packed, and excellent book, Bluestone Magic, Heath reveals much of what he has discovered while tramping the commonly wet and blustery hills of West Wales, and how their perfectly-sited and oriented constructions have never stopped straight-talking with each other and with the, sun, the moon and the stars. ¹

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Be not afeard. The aisle is full of noises

In their book, The Holy Kingdom (P.144), historians, Alan Wilson and Baram Blackett, & the author, Adrian Gilbert, state that when Meurig, King Arthur’s father, was the king of Glamorgan (6th Century), the abad (abbot) of Clas Nanhyfer was Meurig’s brother, Cuhylyn, no less.¹ This would confirm that this early, so-called ‘Celtic Christian’ monastery was a very important one.

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Gors Fawr – the Avenue Revealed

Gors Fawr, meaning Big Marsh, is the location of an important prehistoric ceremonial area in the Preseli Hills of Pembrokeshire. It is the site of the one remaining, almost complete, stone circle in the county. It is built on the dragon energy, Y Ddraig Ffraed.

OS Map Ref SN135294

 

Introduction

Looking back, after three years of walking with Y Ddraig Ffraed back and forth through the three counties of southwest Wales, very few places have matched the fraught confusion that She displayed in the immediate environs of Gors Fawr stone circle.

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St. Margaret’s church & well, Binsey, Oxfordshire

St. Margaret’s church & well, Binsey, Oxfordshire

Midnight, and monks by candlelight

Although less than 2 miles from Oxford’s city centre St. Margaret’s is hidden behind trees and shrubbery at the end of a long and winding country lane. The church is a strange, isolated and moody little building sometimes welcoming and warm while at other times slightly sinister. It is lighted only by oil lamps and candles as it has no electricity supply.

St. Margaret’s was once the living for a priest called Nicholas Breakspear, who became England’s only Pope, Adrian lV, in 1154.

The church is also famous for its holy well and its legendary connection to St. Frideswide, the patron saint of Oxford. I strongly suspect that Frideswide is really the ancient Briton’s goddess and saint, Ffraed.

This was the ‘Treacle Well’ of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

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Llanwnda Well

It was a little after noon when I sauntered into Llanwnda, following the indications of my divining rods.

Very soon the road peeled away and across the grass (where once upon a time, it is said, stood a huge stone circle), ahead of me was the glorious sight and ever more powerful scent of a magnificently blooming may tree. On an ash tree by the hawthorn, hung a slate tile, upon it was painted a cross and the legend, ‘Llanwnda Holy Well’. A really nice simple sign.

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LOVING THE DRAGON

What is a Dragon line?

 

Dragon lines are natural, nurturing, and sinuous Earth currents that were understood by our ancient forebears, who notated, and scored them (like music) with stones, wood, wells, ponds, and earth works, to preserve and enhance their environments.

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